Lies We Sing to the Sea: AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! New for 2023, a sapphic YA fantasy romance inspired by Greek mythology, for all fans of The Song of Achilles

£7.495
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Lies We Sing to the Sea: AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! New for 2023, a sapphic YA fantasy romance inspired by Greek mythology, for all fans of The Song of Achilles

Lies We Sing to the Sea: AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! New for 2023, a sapphic YA fantasy romance inspired by Greek mythology, for all fans of The Song of Achilles

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These cookies allow us to count visits and traffic sources so we can measure and improve the performance of our site. Again, this makes me think the author reads a lot of medieval fantasy (or watches too much GoT) and doesn’t know that all that stuff doesn’t actually translate into Ancient Greece. Melantho (the only character not original, but mentioned in the Odyssey), is another creature, human before, trapped on an island for three centuries. Underwood expertly weaves a tale about the inevitability of fate—and the love that makes us rail against it anyway. Now you understand why I don't read Greek myth retellings anymore even though it's my favourite mythology?

Anyway, if you want a feminist version of The Odyssey written by a female Homeric scholar that’s been studying for literal decades, read The Odyssey translation by Emily Wilson. I liked that it wasn’t really a retelling, but mostly original content that stemmed from a few specific things that happened in the Odyssey. Thank you to Netgalley and HarperCollins Books/HarperTeen Books for an eARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average.

If you do not allow these cookies we will not know when you have visited our site, and will not be able to monitor its performance. people just don’t know what they’re talking about, which in my opinion means they should stop talking about it. Perfect reading for fans of Madeline Miller and Jennifer Saint, Underwood's utterly immersive debut novel delivers a sweeping Sapphic epic of sacrifice, revenge and female courage inspired by Greek mythology. I have to say, firstly, that I have very, very, little knowledge of Greek mythology so read this novel primarily as a fantasy read.Poly stories and cheating plots aren't a sin, naturally, but if you're gonna brag about how you're bringing diversity to the genre and not mention at all that the male/female romance is the more important one, I really really don't see where the confidence comes from. Sarah Underwood weaves an epic tapestry of lies, love, and tragedy, perfect for fans of Madeline Miller, Alexandra Bracken, and Renée Ahdieh . Every so often a sacrificed girl is transformed into a creature of the sea (what exactly this creature is?

Neither the flow nor the use of English, the sentence construction or the expressed imagination is sufficient to define this book as a great fantasy novel. The story is a intriguing, but there's a very slow pacing, sometimes too rushed, other too slow and some dei ex machina I didn't really understand the meaning of (I will talk about them in the very end, so be careful around spoilers). This is a fabulous tale of 12 murdered maids from Homer's Odyssey, when I started it I had no real expectations for it but absolutely loved it. Why would Poseidon set up such a convoluted plot to have princes murdered when he could just demand the lives of the princes outright?anyway, that should solidly debunk the “last 3 or 4 years” claim—there’s plenty in classical Greek authors too—read Sandra Boehringer for fuck’s sake. So that's proof I'm not policing morality or anything, I just demand a logical setup and clear character motivations. And while all of this criticism may be valid, my hackles always get a bit raised when such criticisms take such a negative tone while beginning with the caveat "I haven't read this book , but. Mathias is weirdly passive and honestly pathetic, with no reason for me to even consider caring about him.

I was yelling at my Kindle over and over because that’s not how that works or that’s completely unrealistic. I’ve mostly given up on Greek myth retellings/reimaginings at this point, but since this is a book box pick, I figured I’d at least try it.

I was lucky enough to get to read this book, and after the high hopes from the synopsis, I was still blown away! Leto walks past a tapestry depicting Achilles’ death and yes, it does show him being shot with an arrow in the heel. Like they don’t do much in terms of actually progressing towards their goals for much of it – just attraction and vibes and not killing Mathias when they have very good opportunities for… reasons? The premise and exposition explicitly states that Poseidon was offended by the unnecessary murder of Penelope’s twelve maids three hundred years ago and his punishment is to curse Ithaca and to demand as punishment? They’re not necessarily the best books I’ve ever read, but I read them when they were pivotal to me.



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